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CSPAN
Sep 3, 2012 8:45am EDT
to the way the united states was able to pursue the pacific war in the year after pearl harbor. shortly after the end of the guadalcanal campaign which was 1943, a correspondent named eugene burns wrote a very good contemporary book called "then there was one." and that title refer today the fact that at the height of the guadalcanal campaign, which was the most closely-fought air/sea/land campaign in the war, only enterprise remained afloat of our six carriers that had combat in the pacific in 1942. the only other survivor was uss saratoga which sustained heavy battle damage on two occasions and, therefore, missed almost the entirety of that year. so considering that ed stafford wrote a 200,000-word or book about the enterprise, what is it that here 50 years later warrants another one? and i think there's a couple of reasons. number one, stafford's book is superb on the aviation aspects of the various unions, the squadrons that rotated enterprise during the entire war. but he's told me in a couple of e-mails that he wished he had been able to write a longer book -- and it took him five years
CSPAN
Sep 3, 2012 4:30pm EDT
was essential to the way the united states was able to pursue the pacific war after pearl harbor. shortly after the end of the guadalcanal campaign which was early 43 and the correspondent wrote a very good contemporary book that title referred to the fact at the heart of the canal can pay and which was the closely fought campaign in the pacific war enterprise was in our carriers combat in the pacific in 1922 the only other survivor was the uss saratoga which sustained on two occasions and therefore miss to the entirety for that year of years later couple reasons. number one, stafford's book is superb on the aviation aspects of the various unions, the squadrons that go through the enterprise during the entire war but he's told in a couple of e-mails he wished that they had been able to write a longer book and a road to the cut took him five years to write this one that would include more of the ship's company with with the navy called white hats, the steelers between them and the commission officers and the sheep petty officers who need the ship work and consequently, i wanted to devote a good
CSPAN
Sep 4, 2012 12:00pm EDT
for this is the books are conceived as a history of the united states sort of as told through biographies and i was looking for a woman subject for one of these and in fact i found one but my publisher wouldn't let me do it. can you guess what woman i was looking for and found? eleanor roosevelt. i mean, just the fact that it's a very short list of women who played a large role in american public life on whom i can hang a tale of four or five decades of american history. women have had of course their roles in private life but it is in the nature of private life it usually doesn't survive in the historical record. why did people start saving the letters of eleanor roosevelt? because she was important. do your correspondence save your letters that you write to them and then do they deposit them in the local historical society? well, maybe, and if they do you will become, can i use my words adviseably, here, you will become literally immortal. you will become immortal in letters because future historians will find those letters. they will say ah, that is what life was like at the beginning of the
CSPAN
Sep 23, 2012 6:00am EDT
at what was going on in the united states. and you can even see this in henry kissinger's memoirs and on historical record and an archives in our archives over here how the negotiator for the north vietnamese would bring this up to kissinger. he would bring up what was going on in congress, was going on in the streets to try to rattle kissinger who would always answer this is beneath me, i'm not going to talk about what's going on in the united states. at any end i i believe that north vietnamese leaders never really relied on negotiations to win the war. they knew that they had to win on their own and it had to be militarily on the ground. thank you. >> several years ago i had the opportunity to travel around the it now for six weeks, about half the time in the north, which is to be the north, about half the time in the south. and in talking with people, my impression was people in the north, very proud of having defeated the united states, the great power. people in the south, very sad that the united states hadn't in some way managed to stay, to keep with economists. is that co
CSPAN
Sep 17, 2012 11:00pm EDT
a national security standpoint in my memory but the threat is thread is not outside the united states at this time. at their inability to get their act together and in my view the greatest risk we face from national security standpoint. we want to drill in on this today and i want to say a special thank you to these remarkable leaders who have decided, as talking with chairman gray and he said he has been spending too much time on the outside avoiding trouble and now he realizes the country needs to get in the middle of it to make trouble and i'm thankful he is willing to do something like that. let me turn it to sam subeight. one thing i will say when you work for a senator you work your whole life for them and the advantage of coming to csis as i get paid, so he is the chairman of the board. i turn it over to you. >> thank you john, thank you very much. at least i never did to you what my former senate colleague did to george tenet when he was head of the cia. he used them call them up and make his hotel reservations around the world. [laughter] so i'm not that bad, john. thanks joh
CSPAN
Sep 7, 2012 12:00pm EDT
or iran or turkey invoking the greatness of their own power and impact and the united states tends to be more future oriented but in this particular case you found that the trauma of the hostage crisis and in the iranian revolution is still very formative and the - of americans who are responsible for the iran policy. >> guest: it is. ambassador ryan crocker told me one time in an interview that they are the most historical were the least historical society. and in this case i think there's still certainly every time they have a negotiation including the most recent one in moscow during the whole litany of grievances, so it is always on their mind. whether the u.s. policy makers realize it or not, the are too. the first years after the revolution clearly the hostage issue was for most american policy makers mind. if the iran contra happens that causes the relationship with the next prior risk and we saw it happen to ronald reagan and over a series of instances where they have spurred u.s. efforts to the rapprochement. there's a great example like to give just on this idea of the mo
CSPAN
Sep 22, 2012 10:00am EDT
in a factory, and vanzetti had an odd job after immigrating to the united states and he had started working as a fish vendor. they were ordinary immigrants, but in the united states, they became radicalized of the anarchist leader who advocated violence. but it was ordinary, and i think the fact that they were just too ordinary guys caught in a nightmare that it's part of the reason we are still talking about this today. we think they are there for the grace of god. >> finally, susan tejada come something about your book was april 15th, 1920 you put it in context. it was also the opening day of the boston red sox baseball season, first year without babe ruth. why do you do that, why you put it in the larger context? >> i really hoped to bring their readers and to the story to make it seem real so that the readers might feel they are in the courtroom, they are in the prison and in the death chamber. it's important to make history come alive. >> susan tejada this is your first book right? >> first adult book. >> you've written children's books? what is the name of one? >> i've written childre
CSPAN
Sep 30, 2012 11:00am EDT
and will be on the other side. it's like we have two separate congresses. not a united states congress, but a very republican congress and fighting for it advantage in fighting to win the next election. that did not happen by accident. it did not happen by accident. i believe in the free enterprise system and i believe in incentives. they work. we have created a political system in which every incentive is to not cooperate and not compromise and not talk to somebody who has different ideas than your own. and you know, that's great. it's great to be pure on your principal. but we are a nation of 310 million people. and we have all different backgrounds and we have all different life experiences and we have different ideas that we feel strongly about. the way a democracy the size has to work. no matter how deeply you feel about one issue or another, at some point, you have to be able to sit down with someone who has a different idea and find where the overlap is, find where you can give a little and get a little and get the bridges built. and get the programs that a constitutional program that gover
CSPAN
Sep 17, 2012 12:00pm EDT
'm a forecaster, but we, you know, the united states is in this sort of very different position. you might argue japan, somewhat different circumstances, very high domestic savings rate, managed to sort of face a different set of constraints in that environment, but i ultimately agree with vince that, like, you have to deal with this problem, and you can't get around it. but we're operating under somewhat different constraints. >> john? >> yeah. which is everything's fine until it's not fine. but -- >> i didn't say not -- [laughter] >> the point is this time is different. [laughter] >> anyway, of course -- >> don't want to go there, vince? >> with yeah. >> all this precluding vince and ken's study was music to the ears of the folks at the imf who have had this view for some time that this is how these situations have to be, have to be dealt with. but certainly lew is right, everything doesn't have to get fixed today, but it's got to get fixed, and it's been the key, and the key is that it has to be that people have to have confidence that it will be fixed, and that's the tricky part; namely, how
CSPAN
Sep 18, 2012 12:00pm EDT
, the homeowner would say how could something like this happen in the united states? mikey and chantell sackett our land owners. they bought in 2005 a half acre parcel of land in idaho on which they planned to build their dream home. they obtained necessary building permits, and they started construction in their home in the spring of 2007 by putting on to their lot a bit of gravel. three days after that, the epa and army corps of engineer agents came on to their property and told them that they had to stop building their dream home because they were violating the clean water act. when sackett asked the epa to the court to provide some sort of written explanation as to why the need a federal permit to build their home, they were given the explanation in the form of a compliance order issued by the epa under the authority of the clean water act. this compliance order charged the sacketts of having violated the clean water act and immediately restore their property to its alleged status come and make available to the epa at any moment access to their property and to the business records. and if t
CSPAN
Sep 20, 2012 11:00pm EDT
there was a bill in the united states senate. and what it would do is extend tax cuts for 98% of the families here in massachusetts and 97% of small businesses. and senator brown voted no. now why did he vote no? because they weren't enough tax breaks for the top 2% and the top 3%. for me this is just an example of whose side you stand on. are you holding out? are you hanging in there for the top 2%? are eager to fight for working people. >> excuse me. with all due respect, you're misrepresenting my record. and the only person in this race he was hurt in the middle class wants to raise taxes as professor warren. she would not have supported president obama's compromise bill that not only kept taxes low for everybody for the last two years, but also take care of an employment benefits. she would not have supported that because the fee increases -- sorry, the fact we didn't tax more a high income earners. so she would've been about taxing one taxpayer middle-class people. this is about 700,000 jobs. i did make those numbers up, but 3.4 trillion are all things you have said. he won another million in
CSPAN
Sep 20, 2012 8:00pm EDT
and to perceive that among our membership, one of our members is now president of the united states. [applause] and so it's all the struggles he suffered in the civil rights movement, with all of them marching in the prey and dying people have done for us, please don't any of you walk away without realizing that the struggle continues. and the same type of mentality that would prevent us from voting yesterday exists today with the same motivation to stop this from voting. so with all the pride, dignity and feelings that we have a super weekend and where we are today, please come each and every one of you walk away believing that this is just the beginning, for you, for your children and for your children's children. take me off. [applause] >> charlie rangel everybody. my name is charlie. and now, this is the 42nd annual legislative conference and i want to welcome you to the national town hall meeting. as cochair of this year's annual legislative conference, it's been an on-air and quite frankly a thrill to work with my giant, and i mean that figuratively and literally, congressman andre carso
CSPAN
Sep 12, 2012 8:00pm EDT
for a permanent display in emancipation hall of the united states capitol. the presiding officer: is there objection to proceeding to the measure? without objection. mr. reid: i ask unanimous consent, mr. president, that the bill be read three times, passed, the motion to reconsider be laid on the table, with no intervening action or debate, any statements related to this matter be placed in the record as if read. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. reid: i now ask consent that the senate proceed to s. res. 551. the presiding officer: the clerk will report. the clerk: s. res. 51, commending the four american public servants who died in benghazi libya, including ambassador j. christopher stevens for their efforts on behalf of the american people in condemning the attack on the united states consulate in benghazi. the presiding officer: is there objection to proceeding to the measure? without objection. mr. reid: mr. president, i now ask that the resolution be bread to the preamble be agreed to, the motion to reconsider be laid on the table, with no intervening action or
CSPAN
Sep 11, 2012 11:00pm EDT
. these are not just names that we read. god bless the united states of america. welles remy crowther and my outgoing godfather, michael maca rallied. not a day goes by where i don't interview. we all love and miss you so much. robert l. cruikshank john robert cruz grace yu cua kenneth john cubas francisco cruz cubero richard j. cudina neil james cudmore thomas patrick cullen lll joyce cummings brian thomas cummins michael cunningham robert curatolo laurence damian curia paul dario curioli beverly curry andrew peters charles green. michael s. curtin gavin cushny carlos as dacosta. brian powell vow. thomas a. damaskinos and my brother, fred mercury. we miss you so much. we're all here and your friends miss you, too. >> and my cousin, port authority police officer come you are angel camacho everyday. you will never be forgotten. jeannine marie damiani-jones patrick w. danahy mary san antonio. dwight donald darcy elizabeth ann darling annette andrea dataram lawrence davidson michael allen davidson scott matthew davidson titus davidson niurka davila ada and davis clinton davis wayne terrial davis anthony
CSPAN
Sep 1, 2012 7:45pm EDT
this is going? .. back to birmingham and montgomery. i have one member of the united states state senator i'm going call his name he said to me, john my voting record would be different. sometime you have to brick people to the point, so they can be informed, they can be educate, and be inspired. >> hi. my name is [inaudible] i was on the oat word of d.c. vote. i'm an voting rights activist as the political work. i find it terribly ironic. how many people live in the district of columbia. how many foctds do we have in congress? zero. it's the most frustrating thing in the world. we don't have it here in the district of columbia. >> if it were left up to me if i was a dictators. i would make it happen. >> let's come up with some creative -- you know, by the way, we're honoring julia at the dinner this fall. what can we do? it's the most frustrating thing? >> you have to don't organize and mobilize and don't become frustrated and give up. >> no. we don't give up. >> we need more members, that will stand up and vote for the vote of d.c. that's what we need. organize your friends across the lan
CSPAN
Sep 9, 2012 10:00am EDT
to birmingham to montgomery. at one member of the united states senate from a sudden state. i'm going to call his name. a few years ago he said to me, john, if i'd been on this trip before, voting record would be different. sometimes you have to bring people to the point so they can be informed, they can be educated and be inspired. >> hi, my name is to be that kavner on the board d.c. folk. the voting rights activists as a political work and that senator blair brown eyed. how many people of the district of columbia? on the votes to have a congress? big zero. so what do we do? is most frustrating thing in the world. we do not have a break in the district of columbia. >> you should have it. it was left up to me as a dictator or just make it happen really. [applause] >> let's come up with some creative -- by the way, we are honoring julia bonanno at our annual dinner this fall. [applause] really, what can we do? its most frustrating thing. a >> continue to organize and mobilize and don't become frustrated and give up. >> no, we don't give up. >> we need more members that will stand up and vote
CSPAN
Aug 31, 2012 8:00pm EDT
. a duly trained catholic child, grew up by nuns, came to the united states at almost 18, and i married, do all the things i was told, and when my husband departed with someone else, i was there to take care of three children, to work, clean up, and education to really make a good salary. i continued taking care of them in when they finished high school, i went and i did my ged and became a nurse. that's my strongest memory of you is one day in the debate, surrounded by men, dealing with a situation of abortion, and they all rant and rave why women shouldn't do it, and you just said, quietly, but you stopped everybody from speaking when you said, gentlemen, remember where we are talking where the territory is. this belongs to her, and if she chooses, her doctor is compliant, but it is not for you to say. those words i passed to my daughters who have grown up to be independent, outrageously self-empowered. what i never had in my youth and in my childhood and growing up years and years as a wife. they have been able to stand by themselves, i put your books in their hands, and i went back in s
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17